yeah DIY!

projects for the future

forestfeast:

I know I am spoiled by the produce in California, but I have to say- I do miss the New York City Greenmarket. The produce that pops up in Union Square (and in farmers’ markets all over the city) is truly spectacular, especially in late summer. Coming out of the subway at 14th Street and seeing all the farmers amidst the cityscape is so unique and exciting. While at the market, it’s common to see big city chefs shopping for their dinner menus and The New Greenmarket Cookbook tells the stories behind these chefs and recipes.

The cookbook is by my friend Gabrielle and it’s beautifully compiled with so many fresh ideas. I shot with a lot of these chefs when I was working as a food photographer in New York, so it’s really fun to have this collection of their recipes. Here’s one super simple summer recipe I tried the other day that was a total winner. I made it while visiting my parents’ little cabin up in Sonoma County, where they have an enormous garden with 50+ tomato plants growing this summer (crazy!). Such a simple idea and SO delicious. Happy cooking!

*     *     *     *     *

BROWN BUTTER TOMATOES

From The New Greenmarket Cookbook by Gabrielle Langholtz and GrowNYC. Reprinted with permission from Da Capo Lifelong, © 2014

Recipe by Amanda Hesser, Food52.com and Provisions

2 large or 3 small ripe beefsteak tomatoes

6 tablespoons unsalted butter

Flaky sea salt, such as Maldon

Coarsely ground black pepper

Baguette or other country bread, for mopping up the butter

Most locavores have more recipes for tomatoes than Eskimos have names for snow. But this preparation, which drizzles beurre noisette over tomatoes in place of the classic olive oil, will stop you in your tracks. As surprising as it is simple, it’s the kind of thing you can slap together in mere minutes for a solo snack or serve to guests on fine china.

Core the tomatoes and slice them 1⁄3-inch thick. Divide the slices among four plates (preferably warmed), overlapping the slices just a little. Place the butter in a small, heavy-bottomed saucepan and set over medium heat. Let the butter melt completely. It will begin bubbling. Let the butter simmer away, cooking off its water, until it begins to smell nutty and brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Swirl the pan every 30 seconds or so. When the butter turns the color of a hazelnut, remove it from the heat. Use a soup spoon to ladle it over the tomatoes. They’ll sizzle! You want to dress the tomatoes with the butter, as if you were pouring ganache over a cake—be generous!

Season the tomatoes with salt and pepper, then rush the plates to the table so everyone can taste the tomatoes while the butter is hot. Mop up the butter and tomato juices with good bread. Toast to summer!

Serves 4

(via dizzymaiden)

— 1 week ago with 142 notes
hipsterfood:

What’s the best way to celebrate this beautiful day? Something fall-inspired. Something easy as heck. Something sweet, because I don’t often make desserts and I want it to be special.
I ended up putting together this tasty, sweet, special, easy granola. The cookie butter made my kitchen smell like I was baking Christmas cookies, without all the work. The inclusion of all sorts of nuts and seeds made this feel healthier than it probably is ;) Adding in chocolate chunks & dried fruit at the end makes it a meal in itself. (Breakfast? Dessert? Snack? Up to you.) Try this out for a sweet quick fix!
Read more…

hipsterfood:

What’s the best way to celebrate this beautiful day? Something fall-inspired. Something easy as heck. Something sweet, because I don’t often make desserts and I want it to be special.

I ended up putting together this tasty, sweet, special, easy granola. The cookie butter made my kitchen smell like I was baking Christmas cookies, without all the work. The inclusion of all sorts of nuts and seeds made this feel healthier than it probably is ;) Adding in chocolate chunks & dried fruit at the end makes it a meal in itself. (Breakfast? Dessert? Snack? Up to you.) Try this out for a sweet quick fix!

Read more…

— 1 week ago with 399 notes
#recipes 
truebluemeandyou:

halloweencrafts:

DIY Cheap and Easy Invisible Shoe Tutorial from …And Sewing Is Half the Battle… here. You can find clear insoles at the Dollar Store, so this is a really cheap DIY.

truebluemeandyou: You could also use the insole for the base of barefoot sandlas if you wanted to. For one of the best archives of DIY barefoot sandals go here: truebluemeandyou.tumblr.com/tagged/barefoot-sandals

truebluemeandyou:

halloweencrafts:

DIY Cheap and Easy Invisible Shoe Tutorial from …And Sewing Is Half the Battle… here. You can find clear insoles at the Dollar Store, so this is a really cheap DIY.

truebluemeandyou: You could also use the insole for the base of barefoot sandlas if you wanted to. For one of the best archives of DIY barefoot sandals go here: truebluemeandyou.tumblr.com/tagged/barefoot-sandals

(via dizzymaiden)

— 5 months ago with 1265 notes
hipsterfood:

Easy Almond Milk
We just realized that one of our kitchen staples, homemade almond milk, wasn’t fully posted on our blog. Technically we had a post, THREE years ago (!) but it wasn’t extremely comprehensive. Here’s how to make some almond milk for yourself!
What you’ll need:
almonds, about .5-1.5 cups depending on how much you want to make
water!
a blender
a mesh bag (like we used in our chai concentrate the other day)
a funnel
a large bowl, preferably with a spout
bottles/jars with tops for storage (we use old pasta sauce jars, very useful things)
How to make it:
Pour the almonds into the large bowl, then cover with water. Leave them to soak for a couple of hours, ideally 8 hours if you have a less powerful blender. The longer you soak them, the creamier your outcome. I usually go with 1.5 cups almonds, which makes enough milk for a week’s worth in our house and fits nicely in our blender. I don’t think it needs to be exact, just check the consistency as you go to make it how you want/need it.
Drain the water and rinse the almonds. Pour them into a blender with enough water to cover, then about a cup or two more. Blend on high for a few minutes, or until the almonds are completely pulverized and it’s creamy and smooth.
In your large bowl, place the mesh bag in it, folding it over the sides of the bowl so that you don’t make a mess. Pour the milk into the bag, lift the sides of it and squeeze the liquid out into the bowl. Do this until all that’s left in the bag is dried almond pulp.*
Pour the strained liquid into your storage jars, using a funnel if necessary. Repeat the straining until everything in your blender is gone.
Pour 1/4 tsp vanilla and a dash of cinnamon into each jar, then stir to combine. If you’d like sweetened milk, add in 1 tbsp maple syrup or other liquid sweetener and give it a shake. (I like to add these after straining so you get the full flavor.)
*If you’re interested in not wasting a bit of this process, save the almond pulp! You can either use it again to make more milk (great for baking) or use it in baked goods such as pie crusts, crackers, or in batters. Just store it in a sealed container in the fridge for up to two weeks. (I haven’t tried storing it longer than that, though I’m sure you could.)
This milk lasts about 5-7 days in the fridge - use it in cereal, baking, curries, hot chai, or to make creamy smoothies!
If you’re looking for more non-dairy milk recipes, we have a REALLY comprehensive guide in the Spring 2013 issue of Chickpea Mag - there are recipes to make use of the almond pulp, how to make make milk out of pretty much any nut/seed/grain, best techniques, and best add-ins for each type. Check it out here in print or digitally.
Enjoy! :)

hipsterfood:

Easy Almond Milk

We just realized that one of our kitchen staples, homemade almond milk, wasn’t fully posted on our blog. Technically we had a post, THREE years ago (!) but it wasn’t extremely comprehensive. Here’s how to make some almond milk for yourself!

What you’ll need:

  • almonds, about .5-1.5 cups depending on how much you want to make
  • water!
  • a blender
  • a mesh bag (like we used in our chai concentrate the other day)
  • a funnel
  • a large bowl, preferably with a spout
  • bottles/jars with tops for storage (we use old pasta sauce jars, very useful things)

How to make it:

  1. Pour the almonds into the large bowl, then cover with water. Leave them to soak for a couple of hours, ideally 8 hours if you have a less powerful blender. The longer you soak them, the creamier your outcome. I usually go with 1.5 cups almonds, which makes enough milk for a week’s worth in our house and fits nicely in our blender. I don’t think it needs to be exact, just check the consistency as you go to make it how you want/need it.
  2. Drain the water and rinse the almonds. Pour them into a blender with enough water to cover, then about a cup or two more. Blend on high for a few minutes, or until the almonds are completely pulverized and it’s creamy and smooth.
  3. In your large bowl, place the mesh bag in it, folding it over the sides of the bowl so that you don’t make a mess. Pour the milk into the bag, lift the sides of it and squeeze the liquid out into the bowl. Do this until all that’s left in the bag is dried almond pulp.*
  4. Pour the strained liquid into your storage jars, using a funnel if necessary. Repeat the straining until everything in your blender is gone.
  5. Pour 1/4 tsp vanilla and a dash of cinnamon into each jar, then stir to combine. If you’d like sweetened milk, add in 1 tbsp maple syrup or other liquid sweetener and give it a shake. (I like to add these after straining so you get the full flavor.)

*If you’re interested in not wasting a bit of this process, save the almond pulp! You can either use it again to make more milk (great for baking) or use it in baked goods such as pie crusts, crackers, or in batters. Just store it in a sealed container in the fridge for up to two weeks. (I haven’t tried storing it longer than that, though I’m sure you could.)

This milk lasts about 5-7 days in the fridge - use it in cereal, baking, curries, hot chai, or to make creamy smoothies!

If you’re looking for more non-dairy milk recipes, we have a REALLY comprehensive guide in the Spring 2013 issue of Chickpea Mag - there are recipes to make use of the almond pulp, how to make make milk out of pretty much any nut/seed/grain, best techniques, and best add-ins for each type. Check it out here in print or digitally.

Enjoy! :)

(via dizzymaiden)

— 5 months ago with 906 notes
knittingandcrochet:

threading-on-rainbows:

xchrononautx:

fuckyeahviralpics:

It’s never too late to learn the right way to do things: button sewing technique via imgur → more…

WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN ALL MY LIFE

This makes so much more sense than the way I do it!

Reference for when you add buttons to your projects.

knittingandcrochet:

threading-on-rainbows:

xchrononautx:

fuckyeahviralpics:

It’s never too late to learn the right way to do things: button sewing technique via imgurmore…

WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN ALL MY LIFE

This makes so much more sense than the way I do it!

Reference for when you add buttons to your projects.

(Source: fuckyeahviralpics)

— 6 months ago with 63679 notes

trendgraphy:

Awake your web design skills that rest in your interior my fellow warrior designers:

A Pocket Guide of: 

(via fuckyeahbookarts)

— 6 months ago with 1725 notes
bakeddd:

salted nutella cookies (gluten-free)
click here for recipe

bakeddd:

salted nutella cookies (gluten-free)

— 6 months ago with 223 notes
motleymakery:

DIY Hanging Laundry Hamper:
Easy, No-Sew Instructions from Making Nice in the Midwest.

motleymakery:

DIY Hanging Laundry Hamper:

Easy, No-Sew Instructions from Making Nice in the Midwest.

(via dizzymaiden)

— 6 months ago with 281 notes